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Ebenezer Emmons and John Torrey correspondence, 1828-1846
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Title

Ebenezer Emmons and John Torrey correspondence, 1828-1846

Related Titles

Related/Analytical: New York Botanical Garden Archives.

Series: John Torrey papers ; series 1, correspondence.

By

Emmons, Ebenezer, 1799-1863

Type

Collection

Material

Archival material

Publication info

Notes:

Correspondence from Ebenezer Emmons to John Torrey, dated 1828-1846. Emmons' earlier letters-- while touching on issues of interest in mineralogy, geology, ornithology and other natural sciences-- often concern themselves with the problems of finding a paying position in the sciences that would allow him to stop practicing medicine altogether. He completes his first book, the Manual of Mineralogy, and he and Torrey engage in a lively exchange of animal and vegetable specimens. With Emmons' appointment to the New York State Geological Survey in 1836, however, the letters become more hastily written and single-minded, and the bulk of the correspondence from then on is occupied with his new project and the production of its subsequent publications. This overwhelming concern, however, does not prevent Emmons from corresponding with other scientists, or offering advice to his friend when Torrey receives some discouraging criticism of his manuscript for The Flora of the State of New-York. "I do think you are over anxious about your work & that you will work it over too much," he gently observes, after reassuring Torrey that he in no way agrees with the unidentified critic. In the last letter, dated 1846, Emmons assures Torrey that pay for his work on the survey's botanical section is indeed forthcoming, however slowly.

In English.

Subjects

Beck, Lewis C. (Lewis Caleb), 1798-1853 , Botanical specimens , Bouck, William C., 1786-1859 , Brown, Robert, 1773-1858 , Buel, Jesse, 1778-1839 , Correspondence , De Kay, James E. (James Ellsworth), 1792-1851 , Eaton, Amos, 1776-1842 , Emmons, Ebenezer, 1799-1863 , Flora of the state of New-York , Fossils , Geological specimens , Griffin, Edward Dorr, 1770-1837 , Hall, James, 1811-1898 , Hitchcock, Edward, 1793-1864 , Hopkins, Mark, 1802-1887 , Manual of mineralogy and geology , Mather, W. W. (William Williams), 1804-1859 , Mineralogy , M'Intyre, Arch'd (Archibald), 1772-1858 , New York (State), Natural History Survey , New York State Museum , Torrey, John, 1796-1873 , Trillium grandiflorum , Williams College

BHL Collections:

John Torrey Papers

New York Botanical Garden

Language

English

Identifiers:

OCLC: 994222249

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Download MODS

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Download BibTeX citations

@book{bhl230888,
title = {Ebenezer Emmons and John Torrey correspondence, 1828-1846 },
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/230888},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/134747 --- Correspondence from Ebenezer Emmons to John Torrey, dated 1828-1846. Emmons' earlier letters-- while touching on issues of interest in mineralogy, geology, ornithology and other natural sciences-- often concern themselves with the problems of finding a paying position in the sciences that would allow him to stop practicing medicine altogether. He completes his first book, the Manual of Mineralogy, and he and Torrey engage in a lively exchange of animal and vegetable specimens. With Emmons' appointment to the New York State Geological Survey in 1836, however, the letters become more hastily written and single-minded, and the bulk of the correspondence from then on is occupied with his new project and the production of its subsequent publications. This overwhelming concern, however, does not prevent Emmons from corresponding with other scientists, or offering advice to his friend when Torrey receives some discouraging criticism of his manuscript for The Flora of the State of New-York. "I do think you are over anxious about your work & that you will work it over too much," he gently observes, after reassuring Torrey that he in no way agrees with the unidentified critic. In the last letter, dated 1846, Emmons assures Torrey that pay for his work on the survey's botanical section is indeed forthcoming, however slowly. --- In English.},
publisher = {},
author = {Emmons, Ebenezer,},
year = {1828-1846},
pages = {52},
keywords = {Beck, Lewis C. (Lewis Caleb), 1798-1853|Botanical specimens|Bouck, William C., 1786-1859|Brown, Robert, 1773-1858|Buel, Jesse, 1778-1839|Correspondence|De Kay, James E. (James Ellsworth), 1792-1851|Eaton, Amos, 1776-1842|Emmons, Ebenezer, 1799-1863|Flora of the state of New-York|Fossils|Geological specimens|Griffin, Edward Dorr, 1770-1837|Hall, James, 1811-1898|Hitchcock, Edward, 1793-1864|Hopkins, Mark, 1802-1887|Manual of mineralogy and geology|Mather, W. W. (William Williams), 1804-1859|Mineralogy|M'Intyre, Arch'd (Archibald), 1772-1858|New York (State), Natural History Survey|New York State Museum|Torrey, John, 1796-1873|Trillium grandiflorum|Williams College},
}

Download RIS citations

TY - BOOK
TI - Ebenezer Emmons and John Torrey correspondence, 1828-1846
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/230888
PY - 1828-1846
N1 - Correspondence from Ebenezer Emmons to John Torrey, dated 1828-1846. Emmons' earlier letters-- while touching on issues of interest in mineralogy, geology, ornithology and other natural sciences-- often concern themselves with the problems of finding a paying position in the sciences that would allow him to stop practicing medicine altogether. He completes his first book, the Manual of Mineralogy, and he and Torrey engage in a lively exchange of animal and vegetable specimens. With Emmons' appointment to the New York State Geological Survey in 1836, however, the letters become more hastily written and single-minded, and the bulk of the correspondence from then on is occupied with his new project and the production of its subsequent publications. This overwhelming concern, however, does not prevent Emmons from corresponding with other scientists, or offering advice to his friend when Torrey receives some discouraging criticism of his manuscript for The Flora of the State of New-York. "I do think you are over anxious about your work & that you will work it over too much," he gently observes, after reassuring Torrey that he in no way agrees with the unidentified critic. In the last letter, dated 1846, Emmons assures Torrey that pay for his work on the survey's botanical section is indeed forthcoming, however slowly. --- In English.
AU - Emmons, Ebenezer,
KW - Beck, Lewis C. (Lewis Caleb), 1798-1853
KW - Botanical specimens
KW - Bouck, William C., 1786-1859
KW - Brown, Robert, 1773-1858
KW - Buel, Jesse, 1778-1839
KW - Correspondence
KW - De Kay, James E. (James Ellsworth), 1792-1851
KW - Eaton, Amos, 1776-1842
KW - Emmons, Ebenezer, 1799-1863
KW - Flora of the state of New-York
KW - Fossils
KW - Geological specimens
KW - Griffin, Edward Dorr, 1770-1837
KW - Hall, James, 1811-1898
KW - Hitchcock, Edward, 1793-1864
KW - Hopkins, Mark, 1802-1887
KW - Manual of mineralogy and geology
KW - Mather, W. W. (William Williams), 1804-1859
KW - Mineralogy
KW - M'Intyre, Arch'd (Archibald), 1772-1858
KW - New York (State), Natural History Survey
KW - New York State Museum
KW - Torrey, John, 1796-1873
KW - Trillium grandiflorum
KW - Williams College
ER -