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William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
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Title

William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,

Title Variants:

Alternative: Botanical notes

Related Titles

Series: Biodiversity Heritage Library Field Notes Project.

More Content

Available from: Harvard University Botany Libraries

By


Type

Collection

Material

Mixed materials

Publication info

Subjects

(Henry Nicholas), , (James Graham), , 1821-1874 , 1821-1886 , 1826-1892 , 1828-1910 , 1830-1902 , 1831-1897 , Bloomer, Hiram G., , Bolander, Henry N , Brewer, William Henry, , California , Cooper, J. G , Field notes , Geological Survey of California , Grasses , Hillebrand, William, , Holder, William , Plant collectors , Watson, Sereno,

BHL Collections:

BHL Field Notes Project

Find in a local library

Title

William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,

Title Variants:

Alternative: Botanical notes

Related Titles

Series: Biodiversity Heritage Library Field Notes Project.

More Content

Available from: Harvard University Botany Libraries

By

Brewer, William Henry, 1828-1910 , author

Type

Collection

Material

Mixed materials

Publication info

Notes:

The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864.

William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876.

His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.

Subjects

(Henry Nicholas), , (James Graham), , 1821-1874 , 1821-1886 , 1826-1892 , 1828-1910 , 1830-1902 , 1831-1897 , Bloomer, Hiram G., , Bolander, Henry N , Brewer, William Henry, , California , Cooper, J. G , Field notes , Geological Survey of California , Grasses , Hillebrand, William, , Holder, William , Plant collectors , Watson, Sereno,

BHL Collections:

BHL Field Notes Project

Identifiers:

OCLC: 40290648

Find in a local library

Download MODS

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<note type="biographical/historical">William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting &quot;Botany of California&quot; was eventually published in 1876.</note>
<note type="biographical/historical">His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.</note>
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<topic>Bloomer, Hiram G.,</topic>
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<subject>
<topic>Bolander, Henry N</topic>
</subject>
<subject>
<topic>Brewer, William Henry,</topic>
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<subject>
<geographic>California</geographic>
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<subject>
<topic>Cooper, J. G</topic>
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<subject>
<topic>Field notes</topic>
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<topic>Geological Survey of California</topic>
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<subject>
<topic>Grasses</topic>
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<subject>
<topic>Hillebrand, William,</topic>
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<subject>
<topic>Holder, William</topic>
</subject>
<subject>
<occupation>Plant collectors</occupation>
</subject>
<subject>
<topic>Watson, Sereno,</topic>
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Download BibTeX citations

@book{bhl236107,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Grasses},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236107},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1860},
pages = {31},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236106,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.1. No. 1-161},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236106},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1860},
pages = {96},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236164,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.2. No. 162-312},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236164},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1861},
pages = {96},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236150,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.3. No. 313-558},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236150},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1861},
pages = {108},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236108,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.4. No. 559-841},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236108},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1861},
pages = {108},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236105,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.5. No 842-1035},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236105},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1861},
pages = {108},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236167,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.6. No. 1036-1198},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236167},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1862},
pages = {108},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236140,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.7. No. 1199-1402},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236140},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1862},
pages = {96},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236131,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.8. No. 1403-1493},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236131},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1862},
pages = {58},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236130,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.9. No. 1585-1754},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236130},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1863},
pages = {104},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236151,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.10. No. 1755-1934},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236151},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1863},
pages = {104},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236132,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.11. No. 1940-2160},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236132},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1863},
pages = {104},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236090,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes. v.12. No. 2161-2387},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236090},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1863},
pages = {104},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

@book{bhl236166,
title = {William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers, },
volume = {Botanical Notes v.13. No. 2388-2698},
copyright = {Public domain. The BHL considers that this work is no longer under copyright protection.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236166},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/139293 --- The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.},
publisher = {},
author = {Brewer, William Henry,},
year = {1863},
pages = {96},
keywords = {(Henry Nicholas),|(James Graham),|1821-1874|1821-1886|1826-1892|1828-1910|1830-1902|1831-1897|Bloomer, Hiram G.,|Bolander, Henry N|Brewer, William Henry,|California|Cooper, J. G|Field notes|Geological Survey of California|Grasses|Hillebrand, William,|Holder, William|Plant collectors|Watson, Sereno,},
}

Download RIS citations

TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes v.13. No. 2388-2698
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236166
PY - 1863
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.1. No. 1-161
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236106
PY - 1860
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.10. No. 1755-1934
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236151
PY - 1863
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.11. No. 1940-2160
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236132
PY - 1863
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.12. No. 2161-2387
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236090
PY - 1863
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.2. No. 162-312
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236164
PY - 1861
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.3. No. 313-558
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236150
PY - 1861
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.4. No. 559-841
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236108
PY - 1861
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.5. No 842-1035
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236105
PY - 1861
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.6. No. 1036-1198
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236167
PY - 1862
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.7. No. 1199-1402
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236140
PY - 1862
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.8. No. 1403-1493
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236131
PY - 1862
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Botanical Notes. v.9. No. 1585-1754
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236130
PY - 1863
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -
TY - BOOK
TI - William Henry Brewer California Geological Survey papers,
VL - Grasses
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/236107
PY - 1860
N1 - The Brewer California Geological Survey papers comprise manuscripts, field notes, and notes, and are divided into three series by format: Field Notebooks, Bound Volumes, and Manuscripts. Field Notebooks contains 13 notebooks of field notes pertaining to collections made during the California Geological Survey; they are primarily in unidentified handwriting with page headings, plant names, and some descriptions in Brewer’s handwriting. Bound Materials contains copies of the 13 notebooks bound in two volumes with additional documents in unidentified handwriting. Manuscripts contains field notes on grasses in Brewer's handwriting. The collection is closely related to the field notes of Henry Nicholas Bolander, who succeeded Brewer on the California Geological Survey in 1864. --- William Henry Brewer was born on September 14, 1828, in Poughkeepsie, New York, the eldest son of Henry and Rebecca (Du Bois) Brewer. He grew up on a farm in Enfield and was educated at local schools. His intention was to become a farmer until he became interested in agricultural science. He entered Yale University in 1848 to study soil chemistry under John Pitkin Norton and Benjamin Silliman, Jr. After two years of study he returned to New York, where he held various teaching positions before the desire to work more directly with agriculture motivated him to resume his studies. In 1852 he was one of six men awarded a Bachelor of Philosophy from what would become Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School. Brewer taught in Ovid, New York, for the next three years, but left to continue his studies at Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris in 1885. While in Europe he went on many trips to botanize and geologize in Germany and Switzerland. He returned to the United States and, in 1858, married Angelina Jameson and worked as Professor of Chemistry and Geology at Washington College in Pennsylvania. The couple were married less than a year when Angelina and their infant son died. After their deaths Brewer accepted an offer from Josiah Dwight Whitney to join the California Geological Survey from 1860 to 1864. He undertook extensive botanical surveys of largely unexplored areas of the state. Mount Brewer, in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, was one of the peaks summitted by the survey party and is named in his honor. Brewer accepted the Chair of Agriculture at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1864 and left California at the end of that year. He spent the next four months at the Gray Herbarium, classifying and arranging the botanical specimens collected on the Survey. The resulting "Botany of California" was eventually published in 1876. --- His work commenced at the Sheffield School in the spring of 1865, where he remained until retiring from teaching in 1903. In 1868, Brewer married Georgiana Robinson; the couple had one daughter, Nora, and three sons, Henry, Arthur, and Carl. Brewer was known for his public service, serving on numerous committees and boards at the local and national level. He campaigned with Samuel William Johnson, Chair of Agricultural Chemistry at the Sheffield School, for the establishment of an agricultural experiment station in Connecticut, and was a member of its Board of Control for over 30 years. He also helped organize state and local Boards of Health, serving as president on each, and was instrumental in the establishment of the National Department of Forestry (now an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), and the organization of the Yale School of Forestry. Brewer was a member of several scientific societies and received honorary degrees from Washington and Jefferson College in 1880, Yale and Wesleyan University in 1903, and the University of California in 1910, among his many honors. Brewer died at his home in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 2, 1910.
AU - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - (Henry Nicholas),
KW - (James Graham),
KW - 1821-1874
KW - 1821-1886
KW - 1826-1892
KW - 1828-1910
KW - 1830-1902
KW - 1831-1897
KW - Bloomer, Hiram G.,
KW - Bolander, Henry N
KW - Brewer, William Henry,
KW - California
KW - Cooper, J. G
KW - Field notes
KW - Geological Survey of California
KW - Grasses
KW - Hillebrand, William,
KW - Holder, William
KW - Plant collectors
KW - Watson, Sereno,
ER -