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Stratigraphy and preliminary biostratigraphy of the Flagstaff Rim area, Natrona County, Wyoming
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Title

Stratigraphy and preliminary biostratigraphy of the Flagstaff Rim area, Natrona County, Wyoming

Related Titles

Series: Smithsonian contributions to paleobiology. no. 18.

By


Genre

Book

Material Type

Published material

Publication info

Washington :Smithsonian Institution Press; [for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.],1973.

Subjects

Geology , Geology, Stratigraphic , Natrona Co , Oligocene , Vertebrates, Fossil , Wyoming

BHL Collections:

Unearthed! Smithsonian Libraries' Paleo Collection

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5479/si.00810266.18.1

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Title

Stratigraphy and preliminary biostratigraphy of the Flagstaff Rim area, Natrona County, Wyoming

Related Titles

Series: Smithsonian contributions to paleobiology. no. 18.

By

Emry, Robert J

Genre

Book

Material Type

Published material

Publication info

Washington :Smithsonian Institution Press; [for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.],1973.

Notes:

About 750 feet of sediments of the early Oligocene (Chadronian) White River Formation are exposed along Flagstaff Rim in south-central Natrona County, Wyoming. About 4,000 specimens of fossil vertebrates have been collected from these outcrops. The White River Formation unconformably overlies rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to medial or late Eocene. The lithology of the White River Formation is predominantly claystone and conglomerate in the lower part of the section, changing to predominantly tuffaceous siltstone and conglomeratic channel sandstones in the upper part. Four stratigraphic sections are described. A geologic map of about 40 square miles illustrates the areal limits of the White River Formation and its relationships to underlying and overlying formations. Several distinct and easily recognizable volcanic ash beds occur at intervals within the White River sequence. These serve as convenient markers for precise stratigraphic zonation of fossils and have also provided minerals for potassium-argon dating. Dates obtained range from 35.7 to 31.6 million years.A boulder conglomerate unit, previously considered to be the basal unit of the White River Formation and/or part of the Wind River Formation is shown to be a distinct, and probably unnamed, unit, and should not be assigned to either of these formations. It unconformably overlies the Wind River Formation and is separated from the White River Formation by an erosional disconformity with several hundred feet of relief. This information allows new interpretations of the structure of the area and adds a previously unrecognized episode of deposition and erosion to the history of the area.The most common fossil in the White River sequence is the artiodactyl genus Leptomeryx, which is represented by two morphologically distinct lineages. One lineage is provisionally divided into two and the other into three size groups that are believed to represent different species. The local stratigraphic ranges of the

Subjects

Geology , Geology, Stratigraphic , Natrona Co , Oligocene , Vertebrates, Fossil , Wyoming

BHL Collections:

Unearthed! Smithsonian Libraries' Paleo Collection

Call Number

QE701 .S56 no. 18

Language

English

Identifiers:

LCCN: 72013884
OCLC: 538946

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5479/si.00810266.18.1

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<note>About 750 feet of sediments of the early Oligocene (Chadronian) White River Formation are exposed along Flagstaff Rim in south-central Natrona County, Wyoming. About 4,000 specimens of fossil vertebrates have been collected from these outcrops. The White River Formation unconformably overlies rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to medial or late Eocene. The lithology of the White River Formation is predominantly claystone and conglomerate in the lower part of the section, changing to predominantly tuffaceous siltstone and conglomeratic channel sandstones in the upper part. Four stratigraphic sections are described. A geologic map of about 40 square miles illustrates the areal limits of the White River Formation and its relationships to underlying and overlying formations. Several distinct and easily recognizable volcanic ash beds occur at intervals within the White River sequence. These serve as convenient markers for precise stratigraphic zonation of fossils and have also provided minerals for potassium-argon dating. Dates obtained range from 35.7 to 31.6 million years.A boulder conglomerate unit, previously considered to be the basal unit of the White River Formation and/or part of the Wind River Formation is shown to be a distinct, and probably unnamed, unit, and should not be assigned to either of these formations. It unconformably overlies the Wind River Formation and is separated from the White River Formation by an erosional disconformity with several hundred feet of relief. This information allows new interpretations of the structure of the area and adds a previously unrecognized episode of deposition and erosion to the history of the area.The most common fossil in the White River sequence is the artiodactyl genus Leptomeryx, which is represented by two morphologically distinct lineages. One lineage is provisionally divided into two and the other into three size groups that are believed to represent different species. The local stratigraphic ranges of the</note>
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Download BibTeX citations

@book{bhl266683,
title = {Stratigraphy and preliminary biostratigraphy of the Flagstaff Rim area, Natrona County, Wyoming },
volume = {no.18 (1973)},
copyright = {In copyright. Digitized with the permission of the rights holder.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/266683},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/159232 --- About 750 feet of sediments of the early Oligocene (Chadronian) White River Formation are exposed along Flagstaff Rim in south-central Natrona County, Wyoming. About 4,000 specimens of fossil vertebrates have been collected from these outcrops. The White River Formation unconformably overlies rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to medial or late Eocene. The lithology of the White River Formation is predominantly claystone and conglomerate in the lower part of the section, changing to predominantly tuffaceous siltstone and conglomeratic channel sandstones in the upper part. Four stratigraphic sections are described. A geologic map of about 40 square miles illustrates the areal limits of the White River Formation and its relationships to underlying and overlying formations. Several distinct and easily recognizable volcanic ash beds occur at intervals within the White River sequence. These serve as convenient markers for precise stratigraphic zonation of fossils and have also provided minerals for potassium-argon dating. Dates obtained range from 35.7 to 31.6 million years.A boulder conglomerate unit, previously considered to be the basal unit of the White River Formation and/or part of the Wind River Formation is shown to be a distinct, and probably unnamed, unit, and should not be assigned to either of these formations. It unconformably overlies the Wind River Formation and is separated from the White River Formation by an erosional disconformity with several hundred feet of relief. This information allows new interpretations of the structure of the area and adds a previously unrecognized episode of deposition and erosion to the history of the area.The most common fossil in the White River sequence is the artiodactyl genus Leptomeryx, which is represented by two morphologically distinct lineages. One lineage is provisionally divided into two and the other into three size groups that are believed to represent different species. The local stratigraphic ranges of the},
publisher = {Washington :Smithsonian Institution Press; [for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.],},
author = {Emry, Robert J},
year = {1973},
pages = {54},
keywords = {Geology|Geology, Stratigraphic|Natrona Co|Oligocene|Vertebrates, Fossil|Wyoming|},
}

Download RIS citations

TY - BOOK
TI - Stratigraphy and preliminary biostratigraphy of the Flagstaff Rim area, Natrona County, Wyoming
VL - no.18 (1973)
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/266683
PB - Smithsonian Institution Press; [for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.],
CY - Washington :
PY - 1973
N1 - About 750 feet of sediments of the early Oligocene (Chadronian) White River Formation are exposed along Flagstaff Rim in south-central Natrona County, Wyoming. About 4,000 specimens of fossil vertebrates have been collected from these outcrops. The White River Formation unconformably overlies rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to medial or late Eocene. The lithology of the White River Formation is predominantly claystone and conglomerate in the lower part of the section, changing to predominantly tuffaceous siltstone and conglomeratic channel sandstones in the upper part. Four stratigraphic sections are described. A geologic map of about 40 square miles illustrates the areal limits of the White River Formation and its relationships to underlying and overlying formations. Several distinct and easily recognizable volcanic ash beds occur at intervals within the White River sequence. These serve as convenient markers for precise stratigraphic zonation of fossils and have also provided minerals for potassium-argon dating. Dates obtained range from 35.7 to 31.6 million years.A boulder conglomerate unit, previously considered to be the basal unit of the White River Formation and/or part of the Wind River Formation is shown to be a distinct, and probably unnamed, unit, and should not be assigned to either of these formations. It unconformably overlies the Wind River Formation and is separated from the White River Formation by an erosional disconformity with several hundred feet of relief. This information allows new interpretations of the structure of the area and adds a previously unrecognized episode of deposition and erosion to the history of the area.The most common fossil in the White River sequence is the artiodactyl genus Leptomeryx, which is represented by two morphologically distinct lineages. One lineage is provisionally divided into two and the other into three size groups that are believed to represent different species. The local stratigraphic ranges of the
AU - Emry, Robert J
KW - Geology
KW - Geology, Stratigraphic
KW - Natrona Co
KW - Oligocene
KW - Vertebrates, Fossil
KW - Wyoming
ER -