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Quaternary bat diversity in the Dominican Republic /
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Title

Quaternary bat diversity in the Dominican Republic /

Related Titles

Series: American Museum novitates, no. 3779

By









Type

Book

Material

Published material

Publication info

New York, NY :American Museum of Natural History,©2013.

Subjects

Bats , Bats, Fossil , Dispersal , Dominican Republic , Geographical distribution , Hispaniola , Mammals , Mammals, Fossil , Paleontology , Quaternary

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1206/3779.1

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Title

Quaternary bat diversity in the Dominican Republic /

Related Titles

Series: American Museum novitates, no. 3779

By

Velazco, Paul M.

O'Neill, Hannah.
Gunnell, Gregg F.
Cooke, Siobhán B.
Rímoli, Renato O.
Rosenberger, Alfred L.
Simmons, Nancy B.

Type

Book

Material

Published material

Publication info

New York, NY :American Museum of Natural History,©2013.

Notes:

Caption title.

"June 21, 2013."

The fossil record of bats is extensive in the Caribbean, but few fossils have previously been reported from the Dominican Republic. In this paper, we describe new collections of fossil bats from two flooded caves in the Dominican Republic, and summarize previous finds from the Island of Hispaniola. The new collections were evaluated in the context of extant and fossil faunas of the Greater Antilles to provide information on the evolution of the bat community of Hispaniola. Eleven species were identified within the new collections, including five mormoopids (Mormoops blainvillei, [dagger]Mormoops magna, Pteronotus macleayii, P. parnellii, and P. quadridens), five phyllostomids (Brachyphylla nana, Monophyllus redmani, Phyllonycteris poeyi, Erophylla bombifrons, and Phyllops falcatus), and one natalid (Chilonatalus micropus). All of these species today inhabitant Hispaniola with the exception of [dagger]Mormoops magna, an extinct species previously known only from the Quaternary of Cuba, and Pteronotus macleayii, which is currently known only from extant populations in Cuba and Jamaica, although Quaternary fossils have also been recovered in the Bahamas. Differences between the fossil faunas and those known from the island today suggest that dispersal and extirpation events, perhaps linked to climate change or stochastic events such as hurricanes, may have played roles in structuring the modern fauna of Hispaniola.

Subjects

Bats , Bats, Fossil , Dispersal , Dominican Republic , Geographical distribution , Hispaniola , Mammals , Mammals, Fossil , Paleontology , Quaternary

Call Number

QL1 .A436 no.3779 2013

Language

English

Identifiers:

OCLC: 849921051

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1206/3779.1

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Download BibTeX citations

@book{bhl272964,
title = {Quaternary bat diversity in the Dominican Republic / },
volume = {no. 3779},
copyright = {In copyright. Digitized with the permission of the rights holder.},
url = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/272964},
note = {https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/163448 --- Caption title. --- "June 21, 2013." --- The fossil record of bats is extensive in the Caribbean, but few fossils have previously been reported from the Dominican Republic. In this paper, we describe new collections of fossil bats from two flooded caves in the Dominican Republic, and summarize previous finds from the Island of Hispaniola. The new collections were evaluated in the context of extant and fossil faunas of the Greater Antilles to provide information on the evolution of the bat community of Hispaniola. Eleven species were identified within the new collections, including five mormoopids (Mormoops blainvillei, [dagger]Mormoops magna, Pteronotus macleayii, P. parnellii, and P. quadridens), five phyllostomids (Brachyphylla nana, Monophyllus redmani, Phyllonycteris poeyi, Erophylla bombifrons, and Phyllops falcatus), and one natalid (Chilonatalus micropus). All of these species today inhabitant Hispaniola with the exception of [dagger]Mormoops magna, an extinct species previously known only from the Quaternary of Cuba, and Pteronotus macleayii, which is currently known only from extant populations in Cuba and Jamaica, although Quaternary fossils have also been recovered in the Bahamas. Differences between the fossil faunas and those known from the island today suggest that dispersal and extirpation events, perhaps linked to climate change or stochastic events such as hurricanes, may have played roles in structuring the modern fauna of Hispaniola.},
publisher = {New York, NY :American Museum of Natural History,},
author = {Velazco, Paul M. and O'Neill, Hannah. and Gunnell, Gregg F. and Cooke, Siobhán B. and Rímoli, Renato O. and Rosenberger, Alfred L. and Simmons, Nancy B.},
year = {2013},
pages = {20},
keywords = {Bats|Bats, Fossil|Dispersal|Dominican Republic|Geographical distribution|Hispaniola|Mammals|Mammals, Fossil|Paleontology|Quaternary},
}

Download RIS citations

TY - BOOK
TI - Quaternary bat diversity in the Dominican Republic /
VL - no. 3779
UR - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/272964
PB - American Museum of Natural History,
CY - New York, NY :
PY - 2013
N1 - Caption title. --- "June 21, 2013." --- The fossil record of bats is extensive in the Caribbean, but few fossils have previously been reported from the Dominican Republic. In this paper, we describe new collections of fossil bats from two flooded caves in the Dominican Republic, and summarize previous finds from the Island of Hispaniola. The new collections were evaluated in the context of extant and fossil faunas of the Greater Antilles to provide information on the evolution of the bat community of Hispaniola. Eleven species were identified within the new collections, including five mormoopids (Mormoops blainvillei, [dagger]Mormoops magna, Pteronotus macleayii, P. parnellii, and P. quadridens), five phyllostomids (Brachyphylla nana, Monophyllus redmani, Phyllonycteris poeyi, Erophylla bombifrons, and Phyllops falcatus), and one natalid (Chilonatalus micropus). All of these species today inhabitant Hispaniola with the exception of [dagger]Mormoops magna, an extinct species previously known only from the Quaternary of Cuba, and Pteronotus macleayii, which is currently known only from extant populations in Cuba and Jamaica, although Quaternary fossils have also been recovered in the Bahamas. Differences between the fossil faunas and those known from the island today suggest that dispersal and extirpation events, perhaps linked to climate change or stochastic events such as hurricanes, may have played roles in structuring the modern fauna of Hispaniola.
AU - Velazco, Paul M.
AU - O'Neill, Hannah.
AU - Gunnell, Gregg F.
AU - Cooke, Siobhán B.
AU - Rímoli, Renato O.
AU - Rosenberger, Alfred L.
AU - Simmons, Nancy B.
KW - Bats
KW - Bats, Fossil
KW - Dispersal
KW - Dominican Republic
KW - Geographical distribution
KW - Hispaniola
KW - Mammals
KW - Mammals, Fossil
KW - Paleontology
KW - Quaternary
ER -